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June 16, 2021

letters to the editor

Beliefs are more than mere ‘wishful thinking’
I felt compelled to respond to the challenge given by Cody Yasinsac in his Jan. 26 letter (“Religion and politics”).
The only possible negative consequence I see at all from wishful thinking is disappointment, which we have all experienced on some level during our lives and as a nation. Disappointment is unpleasant but certainly not dangerous in and of itself. I ask you to consider the consequences of a world without religion, which serves as a moral compass and a comfort to hurting people.
I’ve considered a world without “the delusions of religion” as you indicated, and this is what I see: A total disregard for authority or rules. This would lead to more crime and chaos. I also see a complete lack of respect for life, resulting in the absence of humanitarianism, volunteer efforts, an increase in the suicide rate, child abuse, abuse of the elderly, the weak and disabled. Ethics would not even exist because people would have no fear or God or authority, and therefore no reason to behave morally, unless, of course, it benefited them in some way. Morality would be diminished, followed by the family unit, professionalism in the workplace or common courtesy. Forget politics; we’d have anarchy.
That being said, I don’t try to change reality by the pure power of my beliefs. My beliefs, however, do determine my actions, which have a whole lot of bearing on reality. My beliefs also help me stay sane in a world where the things listed above already exist to a degree. Because of my beliefs, I am different, and I can still find joy whenever life doesn’t go the way I want to. If that makes me crazy, then so be it. Either way, I see no harm done.
ó Jamie Shinn
Woodleaf
Take a closer look
In reading the response from people in favor of Tiger World, I noticed that few of them live near the zoo, or even in this county.
My back yard is only a few yards from a cage of full-grown tigers.
I’m sure Lea Jaunakais is a nice person with good intentions. However, accidents do happen. If it could happen in a zoo as large and reinforced as the San Diego Zoo, then an accident could surely happen at this small zoo.
My question is, have the county commissioners actually been on the property to assess the situation?
ó Elvira Linder
Salisbury

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