Ad Spot

May 15, 2021

Editorial: Supply and necessity

As parts of North Carolina struggle with drought this summer and the stateís population outgrows the water supply longterm, what would you consider the most effective method of curbing water usage ó mandatory conservation measures or higher water rates?
The John Locke Foundation is pulling for higher water rates. ěPrices should ration water, not government,î said Roy Cordato, vice president for research at the foundation.
The subject came up at a water sustainability symposium held at N.C. State University last month. A recent edition of the foundationís Carolina Journal included an article on the symposium, at which several people advocated government measures such as incentives and mandatory restrictions to keep consumption down. An N.C. State survey of water customers found 62 percent of respondents would prefer outdoor watering restrictions to a $20-a-month increase in their water bills.
No surprise there. People would seldom choose to pay more for something. Faced with higher rates, consumers probably would cut back water use ó many by necessity. But is the more effective way to slow consumption also the fairer way? Should a natural resource like water be subject to the same free-market principles of supply and demand as tennis shoes and automobiles? One envisions senior citizens on fixed incomes scrimping on water while people with plenty of money continue to irrigate expansive lawns and fill swimming pools.
Actually, thatís already happening.
With the Yadkin River at our doorstep and the city having great water capacity, water sustainability seems like a distant worry for Salisbury. But the only constant is change. As North Carolinaís population grows and the demand for water increases, the state may need a combination of increased rates and government restrictions to ensure an adequate water supply. Weíve seen our share of droughts; we know. No amount of money can pull water out of a dry river bed. When water is scarce, it should be shared fairly, not according to income.

Comments

Comments closed.

Local

Catawba holds baccalaureate services for Class of 2021

News

$9M settlement for two men wrongfully sent to death row

Nation/World

China lands spacecraft on Mars in latest advance for its space program

Business

Gas crunch hits Washington; Colonial Pipeline paid nearly $5 million in Bitcoin ransome

Coronavirus

State mostly returns to normal operations after 15 months of lockdowns, restrictions

Crime

Blotter: Man accused of stealing car, crashing it

Crime

Man faces new charge of attempted murder for father’s shooting

BREAKING NEWS

Gov. Cooper lifts indoor mask mandate for most situations, gathering limits

Crime

Barnes gets new punishment of two life sentences in Tutterow couple’s 1992 murder

High School

High school football: State’s top honor goes to Jalon Walker

Local

Scout’s Honor: With dedication of flag retirement box, Salem Fleming earns Eagle Scout rank

College

North Carolina king, queen of NCAA lacrosse tourneys

Education

Kannapolis seniors walk elementary schools

Local

Local real estate company employees come out in force to build Habitat house

Local

Quotes of the week

Coronavirus

Auditors find oversight lacking for $3 billion of state’s pandemic aid

Nation/World

When will gas situation return to normal?

Local

Rowan native Shuping posthumously receives Concord Police Department’s Medal of Valor, Purple Heart

News

GOP measure on penalties for rioting draws fire

News

Black high school softball player told to cut hair

Coronavirus

State shows 303 COVID-19 deaths in Rowan

Coronavirus

CDC: Fully vaccinated people can largely ditch masks indoors

Crime

One arrested, another hospitalized in Castor Road stabbing

China Grove

China Grove Roller Mill open for tours Saturday