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October 22, 2020

Finding hope for the future in children’s books

By Brooke K. Taylor

Rowan Public Library

I love reading children’s books. In fact, I’ve been spending a lot of time in the children’s room lately — specifically, I have been searching for books about voting — why it is important, how it all started, great leaders in the fight to vote and things like that.

You might be thinking, “Why would an adult want to read a children’s book?”

The reality is that a lot of children’s books authors do an excellent job of explaining complex topics in a simple, straightforward way.

Here’s an example from the book “Vote for Our Future” by Margaret McNamara and illustrated by Micah Player. In this book the children are excited because their elementary school is shutting down for the day, not because it’s a holiday or for construction, but because Election Day is coming and their school becomes a polling station. Over the course of the story the children find out that even though they aren’t old enough to vote yet, they can still help get the word out. They make flyers, have a bake sale and most importantly tell their families to get out and vote.

Even when the adults in their life are ready with excuses, such as, “Why should I vote, nothing ever changes,” the children are quick to reply with solid answers: “Are you kidding? Changes are made every day because people voted.”

These students sound like smart children. Reading this book reminded me that there is hope when we all do what the book says — vote for our future.

No matter what your age, the Rowan Public Library has materials to suit every patron’s needs. From voter information flyers and voter registration look-up to books about previous candidates and election equality, the library is here to serve you.

Visit the Headquarters (Salisbury), East Branch (Rockwell), or South Branch (China Grove) locations, or give us a call at 980-432-8670.

Perhaps you will even join me in the children’s room discovering new books and finding your own hope for the future.

Brooke K. Taylor is interim supervisor of the South Branch of the Rowan Public Library.

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